Tag Archive : regulations

New Swedish regulations could do ‘more harm than good’, according to EGBA

The European Gaming and Betting Association (EGBA) is concerned the new temporary restrictions on online gaming in Sweden will fail to protect players.

Instead, the European industry body warns the restrictions could do more harm to consumer protection than provide help to those who need it the most.

This response comes after Sweden’s social security minister Ardalan Shekarabi proposed a number of measures to limit problems that might occur from online gambling during lockdown.

Restrictions include a mandatory weekly deposit of SEK 5,000 ($497), along with a SEK 100 cap on bonus offers and set time limits on players’ online casino activities.

While EGBA said it strongly supports measures aimed to protect players, these proposed restrictions could encourage customers to gamble on the unregulated market, having the opposite effect.

EGBA also questioned the effectiveness of the measures to protect consumers during the coronavirus, considering they would take place from June 1 until the end of the year.

Secretary General, Maarten Haijer, said: “In Sweden, gambling advertising spending is down and we haven’t seen evidence that average customer spend is up.

“Even so, there is no compelling evidence that arbitrary restrictions on customer spend have a positive effect on safe gambling.”

Australian broadcaster warned over breaching gambling advert regulations

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has told broadcaster Nine to prove compliance with gambling advertising rules, after it was found to have breached them.

An investigation from communications watchdog ACMA found commercial free-to-air broadcaster Nine aired gambling adverts during the pre-game show for games one and two of Rugby League’s State of Origin series, on its streaming platform 9Now.

Australian rules stop gambling adverts from being shown five minutes before the start of a sporting event, if they let viewers know when the game will start at least 24 hours in advance.

But Nine did not notify viewers 24 hours in advance, leading them to be in breach of regulation. This is because, without a 24-hour notice, rules dictate adverts must stop five minutes before the pre-game coverage, 

The ACMA issued the broadcaster with remedial action, including requiring it to conduct staff training on adhering to gambling advertising rules on online platforms, and to submit two written reports proving compliance with the rules within the next 12 months.

Failure to follow these directions may result in a penalty of up to AU$420k (US$246k) issued by the ACMA.

ACMA Chair Nerida O’Loughlin said: “I hope this sends a message to all streaming services that this is something they need to get right.

“One of the reasons these rules are in place is to allow families to watch live sport without exposing children to gambling.”

UK problem gambling issue will improve with new regulations

Lee Willows, Co-Founder and CEO of charity the Young Gamers and Gamblers Education Trust (YGAM), thinks efforts to tackle problem gambling will improve now a number of Gambling Commission (GC) regulations have come into force.

This includes the GC making it mandatory for UK operators to make an annual financial contribution towards gambling research, prevention and treatment; a rule introduced this January. 

GambleAware, GamCare and YGAM were the three initial charities listed to receive mandatory contributions, with five more added since.

The regulation follows a period of scrutiny for the industry involving problem gambling. According to statistics from the GC’s 2018/19 annual report, 340,000 UK adults are identified as problem gamblers.

Willows told Gambling Insider this move by the GC is “a positive step forward” and will help alleviate the issue of problem gambling.

He said: “I think the Gambling Commission taking responsibility for national strategy and opening up the opportunity for a wider number of stakeholders to engage with its delivery, is a really positive step forward. I have no doubt it will accelerate delivery and its impact.

“It gives confidence to the operators that they can donate as it’s counted towards their RET contribution. Working with us or GamCare directly means that operators can see where their money’s going.

“I think it will only improve problem gambling. I just hope there’s going to be more awareness and education, because gambling is a public health issue, a mental health issue and actually there’s a lot of stigma around gambling as well.”

In terms of what more can be done to help problem gambling, Willows believes continued education around the risks that come with gambling from a young age, is key.

Willows added: “We know only 3% or 4% of people receive treatment in the UK so more funding will enable more people to get treatment, which is crucial.

“There is a need to get high population, education programmes to raise the awareness of this as a public health issue, and then those people can go to for any help if they’re having problems with their gambling.

 “The voice of lived experience is something the operators can learn from and also many of us former gambling addicts want to give something back, so if we can give something back in some way, it’s turning what is a negative experience into something potentially quite positive for us.”

State cannabis regulations remain complex, but growers steadily becoming compliant

Save for a few adjustments in state laws, a cannabis permitting workshop in Fortuna on Wednesday carried out in exactly the same way as another workshop 18 months prior — each serving as an effective how-to on becoming legally compliant with California’s pot regulations.

But for state officials walking attendees through the ins and outs of state policies, there’s one evident distinction between past and present workshops: whereas an August 2018 event packed the River Lodge with 100 growers and consultants, only about 15 people showed up to Wednesday’s occasion.

Janice Mackey, a public information manager for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the decline in attendance signals good news that more and more cannabis growers are coming into compliance with California’s legal system.

Read the rest of this story on Times-Standard.com.

California marijuana regulations remain complex, but growers steadily becoming compliant

FORTUNA– Save for a few adjustments in state laws, a cannabis permitting workshop in Fortuna on Wednesday carried out in exactly the same way as another workshop 18 months prior — each serving as an effective how-to on becoming legally compliant with California’s pot regulations.

But for state officials walking attendees through the ins and outs of state policies, there’s one evident distinction between past and present workshops: whereas an August 2018 event packed the River Lodge with 100 growers and consultants, only about 15 people showed up to Wednesday’s occasion.

Janice Mackey, a public information manager for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the decline in attendance signals good news that more and more cannabis growers are coming into compliance with California’s legal system.

Read the rest of this story on MercuryNews.com.